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photo by Sheri Dixon

Wednesday, September 22, 2010

The Good, The Weird, and The Shameless Plug

We've officially (sound of fanfare) started to build the house.

While we were in Houston, they dug out the topsoil, trimmed only as much as they needed to, built up the house pad, brought in the porta potty, set the construction pole for electric and cleared the path to where the bridge will cross the creek so I can feed critters without getting my feet wet.

Even after sitting in the hospital all morning and driving all afternoon to get home, Alec and I HAD to go out to see what-all they'd done.

And it's awesome. The pad is perfect (and HUGE), they did a bang-up job of taking out as little vegetation as possible, and the topsoil is neatly piled to the side- waiting to be put back on top of the insulted earth and have new seeds planted in it.

Alec found a walking stick and climbed to the top of the pile for a photo.

Here's where it gets weird. See if you see anything weird about this photo-



Now read an excerpt from my upcoming book (shameless plug to generate interest and prod me into action to finish the dang thing). The book is titled "Extra-Ordinary- Finding the Magic in Everyday Life" and deals with day to day encounters of an other-worldly nature. No horror movie material, not even particularly spooky, just those things that make you go "Huh. Weird." Anyway- here's this chapter-

Chapter 5- The Alligator Man

We purchased 12.01 acres of beautiful forest, creeks, wetlands and meadow three miles from our current home with the intent of building our 'forever' home there.

Health problems have delayed this move over and over again, but the close proximity to our 'new' place make it easy enough to enjoy whenever we have a few extra minutes.

We're only the third recorded owners of this place, and no one's ever lived there-
at least not since recorded land deeds.

Sometime during the second year of our ownership, Alec started commenting on seeing 'someone' out at the property- he called him The Alligator Man, which frankly kinda of creeped me out, even after I asked for an elaboration of what he was seeing.

The Alligator Man was always seen in the central section of our place- where we plan on building our home, and always just inside the forest. He wears a red cape, has the head of an alligator and a long tail, but walks upright.

Although not threatening, both Alec and I were clearly disturbed by his presence- even though Alec could see him fully, I did see him several times just out of my line of vision- a flash of red cloth unexplainable as anything else.

When we started talking about bridging over the little creek that runs between that clearing and the meadow on the other side, Alec was visibly upset.

"We can't make a bridge- he doesn't want things to cross over the creek".

Right about this time we visited a Medival Faire- complete with jousters, magicians, knights, ladies, swordsmen, and, of course, gypsy fortune tellers.

Alec asked if we could have our fortunes told and I inquired of one of the vendors where we could find a gypsy.

She looked at me, then at Alec, and said "Well, most people go over there (pointing to a colorful gaudy display), but the Real Deal is over THERE" and she motioned to a small non-descript tent.

We headed for the tent.

Diana, a kind-eyed woman with masses of graying hair, looked from me to Alec and back again when I said we'd like our fortunes told. The only adornment in the tiny tent- a blue and gold macaw- glared at us balefully.

She spent a long time talking with Alec and he told her about the Alligator Man.

After sitting quietly while holding Alec's hand, she told us that the Alligator Man was a Native American medicine man whose people camped often on our land many years ago. He was there to protect the land, and just needed to know that our intentions were good- that we love the place as his People did.He's not an actual alligator- he wears a mask and robe used in ceremonies- the alligator is a symbol of protection, strength, endurance.

Diana asked Alec if he wanted the Alligator Man to go away- that she'd ask him to if he'd feel better without him there.

Never hesitating, Alec said, "No- that's his home and now that I know who he is, it's OK. I don't think he's scary anymore".

Other things were discussed, and Diana commented on things she shouldn't have known about us- our family and difficulties we've had. When our time was finished, I sent Alec to find his dad and Diana told me that my son is a very old soul- and that he was lucky to have found me for a mother since I accept and embrace such things.

Some weeks later we were out at the property and were again discussing a bridge across the creek. Alec said it was alright now- things on both sides were now friendly to each other.

We were there without my husband- he was home and we were headed out the very next day for more time away at the hospital, and another long complicated surgery and for luck, we decided to find and bring acorns along with us- one for each of our pockets to tie us to each other and to our little piece of earth.

Sitting in the sunlight on a little bluff above the creek, we both heard something along with the constant birdsong and wind, and we looked at each other, first confused, then unaccountably comforted.

There is only one house within sight or hearing, and that was behind us and empty- everyone was either at school or work.

Wafting up from where the creek runs clear, shaded by the huge ancient trees and lined with ferns- came the unmistakable sound of a Native American chant.


So.

What do you think?

*I* think we've got a heck of a supervisor on this project...

1 comment:

  1. I think you are also the voice of the universe. There is so much power all around us if we can just listen and feel. And the rest of our race can benefit from writers like you who speak of that power in the most matter-of-fact way.

    I'm going to message you a link to my new site. It's still under construction, so I don't want lots of people over there just yet. But you can go over there and check it out. Kind of the way you will have people over to walk through your house while it's being built.

    ReplyDelete

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